Episode 13: R. David Zorc, part 1, on the Bisayan languages

In this week’s episode, we call R. David Zorc on the phone and talk about the Bisayan languages of the Philippines. It’s a fun and informative interview. If you’re interested in Philippine languages, or language classification, tune in and enjoy!

TOPICS MENTIONED IN THE EPISODE:

  • How did Dr. Zorc get into linguistics? and why the Philippines?
  • What separates the Bisayan languages from Tagalog?
  • Hockett’s “L-simplex” and “L-complex”
  • Languages related by “links”
  • Hockett’s x-day dialects”
  • Bisayan “washback” northward from Mindanao
  • the -um- infix is related to the mu- prefix of Bisayan languages
  • the -in- infix became ni- of Bisayan languages
  • Do languages with simple phonological inventories have longer words?
  • language politics when choosing the national language
  • The 10-point step of subgrouping:
  • what is “white charcoal” ?

RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE EPISODE:

  • Zorc’s website with downloads of a treasure trove of Filipino linguistics: https://zorc.net/RDzorc/PUBLICATIONS
  • Zorc, R. David Paul. 1977. The Bisayan Dialects of the Philippines: Subgrouping and Reconstruction. Pacific Linguistics Series C, No. 44. Canberra, ACT: Pacific Linguistics.
  • Wolff, John U. 1972. A Dictionary of Cebuano Visayan, Volume I (A – K). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University, Southeast Asia Program and Linguistic Society of the Philippines.
  • Wolff, John U. 1972. A Dictionary of Cebuano Visayan, Volume II (L – Y). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University, Southeast Asia Program and Linguistic Society of the Philippines.
  • Blust, Robert. 1991. “The Greater Central Philippines Hypothesis.Oceanic Linguistics 30 (2): 73–129.
  • Wolfenden, Elmer P. 1971. Hiligaynon Reference Grammar. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawai’i Press.
  • Wolfenden, Elmer P. 1972. “A Description of Hiligaynon Phrase and Clause Constructions.” University of Hawai’i.
  • Wolfenden, Elmer P. 1975. A Description of Hiligaynon Syntax. Norman, OK: Summer Institute of Linguistics of the University of Oklahoma.

2 comments on “Episode 13: R. David Zorc, part 1, on the Bisayan languages

  1. April Almarines says:

    Thank you for this podcast. I thoroughly enjoyed it!

    Several requests:

    1. You were mentioning data about a guy from the University of Wisconsin – I think we should have some data on that in bullet points or some summary of what was said or mentioned to you regarding the (second) migration to Bantayan, National Archives, 1600’s, etc.

    2. More notes need to be uploaded here, like what is
    PAN
    PMP
    PWMP
    PPH
    PNP vs PSP
    then the subgroups

    Need to include a little summary on Austronesian migration, with time in years so they can understand. When mentioning PAN, PMP, PWMP, PPH, PNP, PSP, etc. Need to mention language names for languages which can be classified as belonging to that level, or which are hypothesized to have formed at that level

    3. It would be good to have visuals that go with it (or any future podcasts). For the above, something like this would be good:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chronological_dispersal_of_Austronesian_people_across_the_Pacific_(per_Benton_et_al,_2012,_adapted_from_Bellwood,_2011).png

    or

    https://cdn.britannica.com/04/2004-004-7102F813/divisions-Austronesian-languages.jpg

    4. A map of the Philippines showing the Bisayas region and the scope of the Bisayan languages would be good:

    https://www.geocurrents.info/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Visayan-Languages-Map.png

    The above image might not be complete in any way, shape or form, but it somehow gives an idea of the extent of the Bisayan languages to the listeners.

    Maybe too much to ask, but I think it’d be helpful!

    I’ll re-listen and let you know if there is anything else.

    Best Regards,
    April

  2. Jarrette Allen says:

    All of these are great points! It comes down to time to do them, though. But the comment will be very helpful for those who desire more information. Salamat!

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